Mind Over Sports

Posts Tagged ‘Super Bowl

If you think you are committed to making a certain event happen in your life – and yet have done nothing about it – then you are kidding yourself. Taking action may involve risk you may not yet be prepared to take. Also, look at your commitment. When formulating your answer, did you use the words “hope” or “try”? If you did, keep this in mind: When you are committed, there is no such word in the human language as “hope” or “try”. Either you are committed or you’re not committed. It’s somewhat like being a little pregnant. Either you are or you aren’t.

If you ever hear a coach say, or read in the newspaper where he says, “We’re going to try to win this game” – forget it – he’s not committed to winning. In fact, he doesn’t believe his team can win. And do you think his team picks that up from him? Absolutely. There’s no way he can hide it. So, if you ever hear someone tell you that they are committed to making a certain event happen in their life, and they say “I hope such-and-such happens,” they, themselves, are not convinced that it will happen.

When Joe Namath was quarterback for the N.Y. Jets, he didn’t say we hope to win or we’re going to try to win the Super Bowl. He said: “We are going to win the Super Bowl.. We are going to win.” Total commitment. And when Green Bay quarterback Aaron Rodgers recently said “I feel like we can run the table,” he didn’t say were are going to “try” to run the table, or we “hope” to run the table.

Beginning the 1997-98 NBA season, there was a cloud hovering above the Chicago Bulls that included: coach Phil Jackson’s status and the dissension between the players and management. But even with an uncertainty of the future, Michael Jordan expressed total commitment to winning by saying: “When we win the championship, I think we’ll see the road we took and look back at this sixth championship and appreciate this as being the most important championship we won…just because of the cards we’ve been dealt.”
In his statement, Jordan used the word “championship” three times in one sentence and clearly stated when we win, rather than if we win. Was Jordan committed to the 1997-98 season? Absolutely. And his commitment affected the entire team in a positive way.
When you are committed, powerful forces take over in your life.

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I don’t think so. According to today’s USA TODAY, Manning was quoted as saying that he understands that he doesn’t have the luxury of time with his current crop of teammates, and certainly welcomes the addition of receiver Wes Welker. But as you’ll recall, four months ago when Denver lost in the playoffs in that double-overtime battle with the Ravens, head coach John Fox made a bad call that eventually cost the Broncos the game. With the score tied and 31 seconds remaining until the end of regulation playing time and the Broncos having two time-outs left, Peyton was instructed to take a knee. I’m sure that irked him and was probably one of the reasons he threw that interception in the second overtime that set up the Raven’s field goal that won the game for them. it seems to me that coach Fox, who has the final word in play-calling for the Broncos, was trying not to lose rather than trying to win. It was such an obvious error that even one of the television announcers asked: “Am I missing something?” So unless coach Fox changes his ways and decides to take risks on the field, the Broncos will never see the Super Bowl while Manning is playing for him.

As an athlete or coach, when you are committed to winning, there is no such word in the English language as “hope” or “try.” Either you are committed, or you’re not. It’s somewhat like being a little pregnant. Either you are or you aren’t. So you can imagine my surprise when I read in today’s USA Today that Lakers forward Metta World Peace said “We’re going to try to win this thing this year.” Does Metta World Peace believe they can win? Is he committed to winning? From my perspective, I would say no. But fortunately for the Lakers and their fans you didn’t hear similar words coming from Coach Mike D’Antoni. His comment was: “Yeah, they (his players) are a very confident group…And now we’ve shifted the focus, and that’s OK. It’s one of those things where it’s (like) ‘OK, it’s too bad (losing Kobe), but let’s go forward and see what we can do.” Notice Coach D’Antoni didn’t use the words “try” and “hope” – and that’s a good sign for the Lakers.

When Joe Namath was quarterback for the N.Y. Jets, he didn’t say we hope to win or we’re going to try to win the Super Bowl. He said: “We are going to win the Super Bowl. We are going to win.” Total commitment.

So If you’re an athlete and you ever hear your coach say, “We’re going to try to win this game” – forget it – he’s not committed to winning. In fact, he doesn’t believe his team can win. And do you think his team picks that up from him? Absolutely. There’s no way he can hide it.

If I were Coach D’Antoni, I wouldn’t give Metta World Peace much playing time. I would concentrate on Dwight Howard, Pau Gasol and Antawn Jamison because they are the players who are most likely to step up to the plate.

Write down on a piece of paper what it is in your life that you are committed to making happen.

Now then, let’s look at your answer.  If you think you are committed to making a certain event happen in your life – and yet have done nothing about it – then you are kidding yourself. Taking action may involve risk you may not yet be prepared to take. Also, look at your commitment. When writing your answer, did you use the words “hope” or “try”? If you did, keep this in mind: When you are committed, there is no such word in the human language as “hope” or “try”. Either you are committed or you’re not committed. It’s somewhat like being a little pregnant. Either you are or you aren’t. If you ever hear a coach say, or read in the newspaper where a coach says, “We’re going to try to win this game” – forget it – that coach is not committed to winning. In fact, that coach doesn’t believe his or her team can win. And do you think the team picks up on that? Absolutely. There’s no way coaches can hide it. So, if you ever hear someone tell you that they are committed to making a certain event happen in their life, and they say “I hope such-and-such happens,” they, themselves, are not convinced it will happen. When Joe Namath was quarterback for the N.Y. Jets, he didn’t say we hope to win or we’re going to try to win the Super Bowl.  He said: “We are going to win the Super Bowl.” And they did.  Total commitment.

Beginning the 1997-98 NBA season, there was a cloud hovering above the Chicago Bulls that included:  coach Phil Jackson’s status and the dissension between the players and management. But even with an uncertainty of the future, Michael Jordan expressed total commitment to winning by saying: “When we win the championship, I think we’ll see the road we took and look back at this sixth championship and appreciate this as being the most important championship we won…just because of the cards we’ve been dealt.”  In his statement, Jordan used the word “championship” three times in one sentence and clearly stated when we win, rather than if we win. Was Jordan committed to the 1997-98 season? Absolutely. And his commitment affected the entire team in a positive way.

One of the most important characteristics of people with a high sense of self-worth is that they speak their mind and don’t keep their feelings and emotions bottled up inside themselves. Such was the case when Tom Brady’s wife, Super Model Gisele Bundchen blasted Tom’s New England Patriots teammates right after the Super Bowl ended by saying (after being teased by a nearby fan who told her “Eli owns your husband,”) “My husband cannot (expletive) throw the ball and catch the ball at the same time. I can’t believe they dropped the ball so many times.” There were four passes dropped near the end of the game, one of the most important by Wes Welker who apologized to the media after the game that he dropped a pass he should have caught. (Another characteristic of high self esteem: taking responsibility for your actions and not blaming other people.) Tom Brady is lucky to have a wife who speaks her mind and doesn’t withhold her feelings and emotions. They make the best wives. And he’s also lucky to have a teammate like Wes Welker.


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